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What's in a Title?

“Roll up, roll up!!! Step inside the strange and mysterious world of… job titles?”

OK, so I may have exaggerated a bit by alluding to the kind of curiosities that you might find in a magician’s tent at a Victorian fair, but the principle is similar. Some job names are just down right bizzare, like Professionalist International and World-Wide Optical and Vision-Focused Tenured Professorship” - an actual role title mentioned in a blog by Coburg Banks which details their top 50 weirdest job titles found on CVs submitted to them (

I don’t know why, but to some employers and employees alike, the exact phrasing of job titles sparks more debate than the specifications of the job role itself. Employers may desire more flowery appellations in order to increase the role’s appeal to potential candidates; employees may feel that certain salutations make them seem more important; or, in some cases, it could just stem from a new form of political madness… I mean, correctness… In any case, we appear to have boiled ourselves up a bowl of befuddlement broth!


I know, I know, not all enigmatic job names are so ridiculously outlandish, and often it’s not the title itself that is perplexing, but that these roles are operating in such a niche sector. Many people in marketing find that their friends and family have no idea what they do for a living, and quoting job titles such as “Back-End Dev.” or “PPC Account Manager” doesn’t seem to clear away the confusion. Also, with some marketing roles being so varied and broad, it can sometimes be difficult to pin down the basic elements.

Therefore, I thought it might be useful to summarise some of the main marketing job titles and their descriptions below (don’t shout at me if I miss you out or overlook a particular role responsibility!):

  • Brand Manager – brand management is the analysis and planning on how a particular brand is perceived in the market. Day-to-day activities involve dealing with the product itself (look, price, the packaging, etc.), and also elements such as the experience and relationship that the consumer has with the brand itself.
  • Communications Assistant - the communications department of an organisation is responsible for enhancing its visibility and reputation across the media, public and key stakeholders. The Communications Assistant often works with the director to promote positive media coverage, reply to media requests and organise press conferences. They may be involved with writing, editing and overseeing the design of print and online materials such as newsletters, brochures and the website, and could also provide support and planning for fundraising events and awareness campaigns.
  • Copywriter – this is a person who writes the text of advertisements or publicity material. Examples of this include direct mail pieces, taglines, web page content, online ads, e-mail content, television or radio commercial scripts, press releases, white papers, and brochures. ‘Copy’ can also appear in social media content including blog posts, tweets, and social-networking site posts.
  • Web Developer –the confusing one, well for me anyway! So, I’ll break it down in to each type
  • - Front End Developer: The front end of the website is the part that users actually see and interact with, so front end developers are responsible for a seamless user-experience.  They deal with things like images, colours, buttons, forms, typography, and animations. The three main languages they use are HTML, CSS, and Javascript.
  • - Back End Developer: The back end of a website consists of a server, an application, and a database. The building and maintenance of this technology is the responsibility of the back end developer, and their work enables the existence of the user-facing side of the website. In order to link the three above elements, the ‘Back-End Dev’ uses languages such as PHP, Ruby, Python, Java, and .Net for the application, and tools like MySQL, Oracle, and SQL Server to deal with data and serve it back to the user in front-end code. 
  • eCommerce Marketing Manager- the purpose of this role is to oversee a retail company's online sales and presence. They are responsible for conveying a consistent brand image which should attract customers and increase sales online. Managers oversee a team of designers and marketers who create the online transaction system and the website’s appearance. 
  • PPC Executive - PPC stands for pay-per-click, a model of internet marketing in which advertisers pay a fee each time one of their ads is clicked (buying visits to your site, rather than “earning” them organically). A PPC Executive is responsible for the creation, analysis and reporting of these campaigns. 
  • Public Relations Manager - The main focus of the public relations function (PR) is to manage the reputation of a company. This means a PR Manager needs to build and sustain good relationships between the organisation and its clients. They do this through publicity campaigns and PR activities such as presentations and press releases; dealing with enquiries from the public, the press, and related organisations; press conferences, open days, exhibitions, tours and visits etc.
  • SEO Executive – SEO (search engine optimisation) is the process of ''optimizing'' a website so that search engines will find it. SEO considers how search engines work, what people search for, the actual search terms or keywords typed into search engines and which search engines are preferred by their targeted audience. The day to day activities of an SEO Exec include keyword research, market analysis, and content optimization. They also use analytics to determine the effectiveness of Internet marketing campaigns. 

Quite a long list, I know, but I like to be thorough! Maybe you are in one of these roles and are looking to hear about new opportunities? Here at Forward Role, we specialise in recruiting for all of these positions and more, focusing on the marketing, digital, analytics & creative sectors, so get in touch! or 0161 914 8499



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